Information, reviews and public commentary for US companies

 

Petsmart

Rating
1.014516
Address
19601 N 27th Ave
Phoenix, AZ
85027-4010
County
Maricopa
Contact
Philip Francis
Role
Chairman of the Board
Phone
(623) 580-6100
Annual Sales Est
$2,147,483,647
Employees
26,500
SIC Code
5999
General profile image

Cayce Marie - 1 d ago

0

PetSmart is not so smart. In the sourthern California store they have arbitrarily decided NOT to allow HalfWayToHome (HWTH), a fantastic shelter that tends to dogs needing assistance and places them in good homes!) to show their dogs for adoption at PetSmart. Why on earth would you do this....... are you CRAZY??????????? HWTH is run by a saint!! She loves the dogs does right by them.......... !! If you follow through with this ban and are determined not to let her showcase her dogs looking for loving adoptive family I have no use for you. Your rep precedes you Pet(NOT SO)smart........!!!!!!!!!!!! You just lost my business and I'm telling everyone I know about this. I hope you have the guts to do the right thing.

General profile image

Educated x customer who detests stupidity. - 1 d ago

PetSmart has poor management to hire young individuals in their 20s who do not know state or federal labor laws nor how to do conflict resolution or mediation or have active listening skills is Despicable. Customers should not have to suffer indignities from children managers like Courtney and a Tennessee PetSmart. She is highly uneducated lies about a customer and passes on false information never go to a PetSmart in Tennessee.

General profile image

Moorestown, NJ store - 15 d 7 h ago

0

Soon a petition and grievance will be filed against PetSmart on behalf of over a dozen former employees of a PetSmart store in NJ.

Back in September of 2017 the Moorestown NJ store on Nixon Drive (store in question) came under a new store manager (L'erin Gaines and assistant store manager (Amanda). Corporate knowingly transferred one Mr. L' erin Gaines from the Fairless Hills, PA. store due to mistreated employees threatening to all quit if he remained employed there. Knowing such an awful tyrant of a person is in charge of people's livelihoods and careers, corporate desides to transfer him to the Moorestown, NJ store location. It didn't take long at the new location in Moorestown that Mr. Gaines continued his tyranny and threatening ways towards the employees that were working there for months and even years. It didn't take long for Mr. Gaines to force employees and managers alike to quit, resign, walk out or get fired. His tyranny and very poor management continued for a better part of 8 to 9 months upon arriving. Why would corporate back a store manager knowing that he has a history of being a major problem, just to cause it elsewhere? This is why a petition and grievance soon will be done in place of over a dozen employees and managers that lost, forced to quit, walked out on or gotten fired while Mr. Gaines was the store manager at the Moorestown, NJ location.

Solution????? Yes, an investigation should be done immediately. All employees/managers that were abused by this man and forced out of their livelihoods by him should get their jobs back or offered so if they want it.

General profile image

Theresa E Watts - 14 d 18 h ago

3

Is this why ms lindsey anarina left the fairless hills store? What a lovely person she was a great manager for yrs - now we never see her. She would of never quit unless she was forced too!!

General profile image

Anonymous - 14 d 17 h ago

Thank you Theresa. Yes, I truly believe that is exactly what happened to your manager because it happened in the Moorestown store as soon as this Mr. L'erin Gaines took over day one. He drove several managers (3 that I'm currently aware of) and at least a dozen employees out. He wanted people working under him that "he wanted". The assistant store manager Amanda wanted one manager gone because she didn't like her personally, nothing else. Only five original employees remain since he took over in September, I give them props on surviving his rule there.

Good news, I learned that both L'erin and Amanda both quit their jobs. Still, those employees and managers are gone but, not forgotten. The voiceless now has a voice.

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 6 h ago

WAKE UP.....PETSMART. When a dog in grooming is mistreated you act on it by putting in cameras, stricter grooming classes, etc. etc.

But when hard working employees/managers lose their livelihoods due to a bad manager you do nothing. Why??? Sure, still you bring home a check every week, put food on your families table, pay your bill's, etc. What about all of those people? Someone knew about this terrible store manager if he was moved from store to store due to employees threatening to all quit at once. For gods sake, why not help the people that worked so hard for you? Doing nothing you're saying that your employees are valued less then the pets of customers.

General profile image

Bullied out of jobs - 7 d 19 h ago

Advice Workplace Bosses & Coworkers What can I do about workplace bullying? How to stand your ground against a bully in the workplace, be they an abusive boss, co-worker, or subordinate. Daniel Bortz, Monster contributor What can I do about workplace bullying? Bullying doesn't just happen on the playground. Roughly one in five U.S. adults say they have directly experienced bullying on the job, according to a 2017 survey by the Workplace Bullying Institute. Quitting may also be the right move for your health, since research shows repeated bullying can trigger physical and mental health problems such as high blood pressure, difficulty sleeping, anxiety, and depression. "At its core, bullying is about power," says Tara Fishler, a conflict-resolution specialist. "When someone feels threatened or powerless, they try to exert power over other people through bullying." Examples of bullying at work The Workplace Bullying Institute survey defines bullying as "repeated mistreatment of an employee by one or more employees; abusive conduct that is: threatening, humiliating, or intimidating; work sabotage; or verbal abuse." Some experts say it goes further than that. "Workplace bullying is psychological violence," says Lynne Curry, author of Beating the Workplace Bully: A Tactical Guide to Taking Charge. "A bully is someone who repeatedly and intentionally goes after a target." Being a victim of bullying can have devastating effects on your career. Approximately 65% of bullied targets lose their job, either because they voluntarily leave to escape more mistreatment, quit when conditions become worse, or are terminated by their employer, the survey found. Who are typical workplace bullies? The survey found the majority of workplace bullies are men (70%), 61% are bosses, 33% are peers with the same rank as their targets, and 6% are subordinates. Also, despite common misconception, there is same-sex bullying in the workplace: Male perpetrators prefer targeting women (65%), but many target other men (35%); conversely, 33% of female bullies target other women. Types of workplace bullies The mean-spirited prankster. Like the class clown in high school, this person plays jokes on co-workers. Sure, some office gags are perfectly innocent, but there's a line between playing a harmless prank and intentionally humiliating someone. The jerk. Some people, like the jerk, are simply mean by nature. This person brings a toxic attitude to the office environment by delivering angry or condescending remarks to their co-workers. The saboteur. This bully's agenda is to undermine your every move and prevent you from succeeding at your job. Saboteurs view their peers as competitors that they need to squashnot collaborators. The constant critic. This person, typically in a management position, talks down to direct reports and picks apart your work. The gossip. Every office has one, but gossiping can become a form of bullying if the perpetrator is out to tarnish your reputation. The gatekeeper. Taking a more indirect approach, this person withholds resources that you need to succeed (e.g., a boss who doesn't provide you with adequate time to complete a project). What to do if you're being bullied Sure, it would be great if someone else stepped in and put a stop to the bullying, but unfortunately, this may fall on your shoulders. Your strategy will depend on who is bullying you, says Gary Namie, director of the Workplace Bullying Institute and co-author of The Bully-Free Workplace: Stop Jerks, Weasels, and Snakes From Killing Your Organization. If a peer or subordinate is bullying you, turn the tables by deflecting the person's attacks. To achieve this, Curry says you should have nonchalant responses ready to use the next time the person says something negative to you (e.g., "Give it a rest," "Nice try, but I'm not biting"). But if the bullying continues, compile evidence that you can present to your manager. "Document everything," Fishler says. "Dates, times, and places the bullying happens." You'll have to take a delicate approach if your boss is the bully. "You can't stand your ground as readily, since there's a power dynamic," Namie says. First know that there's strength in numbers. "You need to break the silence with co-workers," Namie says. "Chances are you're not the only person [being bullied], and you can use your collective power to mobilize as a group." Together, you can build a case that highlights why your boss' bullying is hurting the company's bottom line"turnover, absenteeism, and lower productivity," Namie saysand present your case to a senior manager. Know when to escalate matters. "In general, an employee should consider approaching HR when they have either tried, unsuccessfully, to address the situation with their supervisor, or feel unable to do so," says Fishler. So if your bully's rank is high above your own, or you fear your bully could retaliate against you for standing up for yourself, you may want to reach out to HR. Again, have clear documentation of incidents, including dates, times, and places. Find another job If you can't get the bullying to stop, there's no shame in resigning from your company. Leaving a job and embarking on a job search might initially add to your anxiety, but it doesn't have to. Need some help? Join Monster today. As a member, you can upload up to five versions of your cover letter and resumeeach tailored to different types of jobs that interest you. Recruiters search Monster every day looking to fill top jobs with qualified candidates, just like you. Additionally, you can get job alerts sent to your inbox the moment new positions become available. Don't waitthere are plenty of employers who will ensure that you're treated with the respect you deserve. Related Articles 100 companies hiring now, July 2018 How to stop workplace gossip Are you being taken advantage of at work? Expert answers on workplace bullying Who is your workplace bully? Most Recent Jobs Design Engineer MOORE STAFFING SERVICES North Shore, MA FULL-TIME POLICE OFFICER WEST MIFFLIN BOROUGH West Mifflin, PA, 15122 General Labor Mobile Home Transportation Service Elwood, IL, 60421 Welders, CDL Drivers and General Laborers O'connor Kiln & Dryer Mc Burbank, SD, 57010 Maintenance Worker City Of Vermillion Vermillion, SD, 57069 See More Jobs Monster logo Find Jobs Post Jobs About Monster Contact Us Terms of Use Privacy Center Security Center Find us on social media: Google Plus Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Copyright 2018 - Monster Worldwide Looking for Monster Cable?

General profile image

Pitbulls are dogs too, pets too. - 7 d 29 s ago

We would love to hear from Ms. Lindsey and others from Fairless Hills along from Moorestown, NJ. We want your voices, experiences out there for all to see. We are fighting for those that were screwed out of employment and their jobs. We want only retribution and for them to get their jobs BACK. We see you Angel. We see you hiding behind a corporate logo. Come out and help those that were wronged. We are waiting on you. Let's hear it!!!

General profile image

Anonymous - 14 d 17 h ago

Goes to prove that the only thing that a major corporation like this cares about is what to name their yachts and which model Cadillacs to buy then their own hard working employees that was screwed by a monster at one of their locations. Lining their pockets with money, not the pets or out of work employees/managers matters most to them.

General profile image

Susan - 13 d 6 h ago

When I was informed of this posting I was appalled. My daughter was a pet care associate working for him, one day my daughter came home hysterical and clearly upset. She was talked down to and belittled bad to the point of tears. Thank god she doesn't work there anymore, though the experience scarred her. I hope all of the former employees and managers get the justice they deserve from corporate. It's hard this day and age losing a job you enjoy doing.

General profile image

Close To The Situation - 13 d 4 h ago

Goes to prove, the lives that were affected by this situation. It needs to be addressed and rectified. My deepest sympathies Susan I am sorry to hear about your daughter having to go through that, no one should, especially all those out of work employees & managers. I can only imagine what you're all going through or have gone through. There's people out there that either can relate or they'll have your back. Let's hope that they fix this. A manager especially a store manager like this one got away with murder, or so he thinks. This isn't going away quietly nor will it get swept under the rug. Believe it or not, they all have rights and deserve justice.

That's why I am working close to the situation and getting down to the core of it all. The truth of it is shocking and disgustingly too similar to be made up.

General profile image

Unemployed and Poor Now - 11 d 8 h ago

Thank God there's laws in this country that protect the Wrongfully Terminated and each state has their own Employee Rights laws. We know HR/PetSmart Corp. doesn't read these. It helps get the word out that numerous voices are much louder than one. We're not asking for alot, we're only asking for, hoping for our jobs/careers back that was wrongfully taken from us. For every Groomer, Cashier, Pet Care Associate, Stocker, Manager and employee that loved their jobs, we do this for you.

General profile image

A HIGHER POWER - 11 d ago

M.P.G.A. MAKE PETSMART GREAT AGAIN.

Thank you, everyone that has come forward so far in this battle to tell your story on this situation. We have so much Intel now that proves you were wronged and illegally terminated from your jobs/careers. You deserve justice, you deserve jobs to support your families and loved ones. Soon, you will be back to work.

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 7 h ago

Sickining how you all lost your jobs due to a bad boss. Corporate or their HR department are morons and need to hire you all back. Please read on.......Do you have a bad boss? No, not one of those bad ordinary bosses who fail to give direction and recognition. Those are low-stress bad bosses. You've got the type of bad boss who bullies, insults, lies, changes your directions, blames others, and verbally assaults your self-esteemevery day. You've confronted the boss with his behaviornicelybut it didn't put a dent in his game. You've talked to Human Resources but they threw their hands up in frustration. Apparently, the guy gets the job done and the higher-ups like him. But, they've never seen him in action, you argued. "Talk to more employees. I'm not the only one complaining." He's on his best behavior when senior managers or HR staff are around. So, it's almost impossible to communicate what you and your coworkers experience every day. No pattern of employees leaving exists, you're told, which would set off red flags, but the boss has only been in this position for a year. Half of the office is actually looking for a new job. You Need to Take Action or Leave Your Bad Boss Behind You like your job, your company, and coworkers. The only problem is your current boss. You're beyond self-pity and annoyance. You're scared but you can't take the bullying anymore. You've decided that you either need to take action or get a new job. Those are your remaining choices. Maybe it's time for you to take action to get him gone. The best way, if you can figure out how to set it up, is for senior management to see him in action. They've always treated you with respect and you don't believe that they'd put up with his daily behavior if they could just see it. The Balance Careers How to Fire Your Bad Boss Menu Search Search GO Ad HUMAN RESOURCES EMPLOYEE MANAGEMENT How to Fire Your Bad Boss Businessman tearing paper You Can Get Rid of Your Bad Boss if You Follow These GuidelinesCarefully Share Flip Pin Share Email BY SUSAN M. HEATHFIELD Updated November 04, 2017 Do you have a bad boss? No, not one of those bad ordinary bosses who fail to give direction and recognition. Those are low-stress bad bosses. You've got the type of bad boss who bullies, insults, lies, changes your directions, blames others, and verbally assaults your self-esteemevery day. You've confronted the boss with his behaviornicelybut it didn't put a dent in his game. You've talked to Human Resources but they threw their hands up in frustration. Apparently, the guy gets the job done and the higher-ups like him. But, they've never seen him in action, you argued. "Talk to more employees. I'm not the only one complaining." He's on his best behavior when senior managers or HR staff are around. So, it's almost impossible to communicate what you and your coworkers experience every day. No pattern of employees leaving exists, you're told, which would set off red flags, but the boss has only been in this position for a year. Half of the office is actually looking for a new job. You Need to Take Action or Leave Your Bad Boss Behind You like your job, your company, and coworkers. The only problem is your current boss. You're beyond self-pity and annoyance. You're scared but you can't take the bullying anymore. You've decided that you either need to take action or get a new job. Those are your remaining choices. Maybe it's time for you to take action to get him gone. The best way, if you can figure out how to set it up, is for senior management to see him in action. They've always treated you with respect and you don't believe that they'd put up with his daily behavior if they could just see it. The Best Way to Get Your Bad Boss Fired So, the very best way is to set up a situation in which the boss will exhibit the worst of his behaviors publicly and in front of his boss. It's not as if his boss has not heard rumors before about his behavior, but he may have been unaware of how bad the behavior really is. In an organization, it is a powerful intervention to have the boss act out his worst behaviors in front of his own boss. Nothing else works as well if it's time to fire your boss, and other options are fraught with danger for the employee. Here are a couple of ways to minimize the danger if you decide to look at other options first. Take Action to Remove a Bad Boss Understand that danger exists when you decide it is time to fire your boss. If he is well thought of, you may bring trouble and insecurity to your own employment. You may bear the brunt of your organization's displeasure if your efforts to fire your boss don't succeed. Free Guide: How to Nail Your Next Interview We'll email you tips to make a good impression and get the offer. ONE-TAP SUBSCRIBE In any case, your efforts draw a magnifying glass to your own performance. So consider other solutions before you decide that your only recourse is to fire your boss. If you're not quite brave enough or you haven't yet thought of the perfect scenario for setting your boss up to exhibit his worst behavior, here are additional actions that you need to take. Check to see if you can talk to HR in confidence. Seek their confidential assistance to advise you about how to address the situation. Your company may have a formal complaint process. HR staff may know this bad boss and recommend ways to respond to him effectively. The heads-up may elicit some manager coaching by the HR staff. But, if your name is connected to the situation, a bad boss will retaliate. You can count on it. If you belong to a union or work for the government, go to your representative first. Contractual rules and obligations may exist that you need to follow for best results. The union representative may even be willing to intervene. Document everything. Document each incident of the boss's bad behavior with the dates and the names of witnesses. Bully bosses don't always have multiple targets; you may be in the situation alone if the boss has taken a dislike to just you, for whatever reason. (If this is the case, you need to determine why you are the target of his worst behavior.) In addition to documentation, make a list of the issues employees have with the boss to go along with ita condensed version that succinctly identifies each behavior. And, if you can, ask other employees to sign it; they may not. People are afraid of losing their jobs; they may not experience the situation as intensely as you do, and they may want to avoid conflict. Develop a safe path to your boss's manager. If you have developed a working relationship with your boss's boss, he is more likely to take your complaints seriously. With a bully boss, you must develop this relationship with care or it will become another point in your boss's bullying. If the first time you speak to your boss's manager is to file a complaint, you have less credibility. Actively, seek witnesses. Following each outburst, note who saw the scene. Turn to these coworkers to build alliances. Ask your coworkers to document their experience with the bad boss, too. You will find safety in numbers and the more employees adding their voice to the complaints, the harder it is for senior managers to ignore or deny the problem. An employee who attempts to remove a bad boss, no matter how bad the boss, may lose his or her job. So, be prepared to lose your job, if your boss turns it around and you lose the battle. Even if you are 100 percent right, you still may end up losing. Your company may back your boss. Your organization had reasons to assign your boss to his management role. Perhaps he has skills and produces the results that the company needs. If you are his sole target, it is easier to remove you. By the time the organization realizes that he always has a target, you will be long gone.

General profile image

Loved Their Job - 12 d ago

I know I'd still be working there if a certain "ahem" store manager didn't take over and bring fire and brimstone down on all of the employees. I loved my job and I'd return in a heart beat if I could. I don't blame corporate for his doings but, they were aware (someone was if they transferred him from one store to another) of his nasty habits and allowed it to continue.

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 7 h ago

Constructive dismissal, also known as constructive discharge or constructive termination, is a modified claim of wrongful termination. Wrongful constructive dismissal occurs when, instead of firing the employee, the employer wrongfully makes working conditions so intolerable that the employee is forced to resign. As in wrongful termination, the employer must violate the employment contract or public policy by targeting the employee. Continue below to learn more about constructive dismissal.

See FindLaw's Wrongful Termination section to learn more.

What Is Constructive Dismissal?

Most states recognize the legal concept of constructive dismissal, in which an employee quits because the working conditions have become so intolerable that he or she can no longer work for the employer. Even though the employee voluntarily quit, the employee had no reasonable alternative because of the intolerable working conditions.

The employee's resignation is overlooked for legal purposes because the employment relationship was in effect terminated involuntarily by the employer's conduct. In this situation, the resignation is treated as a firing. If the employer's actions constitute unlawful conduct or a breach of an express or implied employment contract, the employee may have a claim for wrongful constructive dismissal.

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 6 h ago

GOES TO PROVE, SOMEONE AT CORPORATE EITHER HR OR THE DISTRICT MANAGER KNEW OF THIS STORE MANAGERS AWFUL DOINGS, OR TERRIBLE WAYS OF TREATING EMPLOYEES UNDER HIM AND ALLOWED HIM TO CONTINUE IT.

THIS IS NOT NOT A WAY TO RUN A COMPANY.

WE ASK WHY???? WHY DID YOU ALLOW IT???? WHY ARENT YOU CORRECTING THIS WRONG???? WHY LOOK THE OTHER WAY???? GOOD HARD WORKING EMPLOYEES WITH GOOD WORK RECORDS LOST THEIR JOBS UNDER A HORRIBLE BOSS. WAKE UP MAN!!!!!!! DO WHATS RIGHT.

General profile image

Standing Up 4 Unemployed - 10 d 7 h ago

They claim they care about their customers, "assiciates" and communities, clearly they don't. From PetSmart - Compliance & Ethics About PetSmart's Ethics & Integrity Program PetSmart's core value of Caring is the foundation of our Ethics & Integrity Program. We Care for our customers, associates and communities and believe that our Ethics & Integrity Program is key to strengthening our unique culture. Having a consistent roadmap to guide our behaviors and decisions will help us remain successful and true to our mission. We have established a foundation of trust with our customers, associates, and communities, and it's up to us to do the right thing and protect this reputation. PetSmart is committed to providing education, training and awareness to our associates regarding our Ethics & Integrity Program. Our Ethics & Integrity department is responsible for the oversight of the Company's Code of Ethics & Integrity (E&I) and reviewing E&I allegations to ensure they are handled appropriately. The E&I department works collaboratively with other departments such as Human Resources, Internal Communications, and Training to ensure we provide awareness and training to emphasize compliance throughout our company. We have designated E&I Champions in each department to assist in ensuring a strong E&I culture. Code of Ethics & Integrity At PetSmart, we pride ourselves on doing the right thing, even when it's hard. This means that we take responsibility and act with integrity. Our Code of Ethics & Integrity guides us in making decisions that impact our customers, our associates, and the communities where we live and work. By following the Code of Ethics & Integrity, we make sure that we do our job in a way that lives up to our values and follows the law. Click here to download our Ethics & Integrity Code of Conduct - English Click here to download our Ethics & Integrity Code of Conduct - Spanish Click here to download our Ethics & Integrity Code of Conduct - Chinese Click here to download our Supplier Code of Conduct - English Click here to download our Supplier Code of Conduct - Chinese Click here to download our Summary Supplier Code of Conduct CareSmart Open and honest communication is the expectation at PetSmart, not the exception. We support an Open Door Policy where associates can voice their concerns with their immediate supervisor, a higher level of management, Human Resources, the Ethics & Integrity department, or via the CareSmart hotline. CareSmart is administered by an independent third-party service. Associate information will be treated confidentially and people who call CareSmart can remain anonymous if they prefer. Contact information for CareSmart and our Ethics & Integrity department are available in our Code of Ethics & Integrity on Fetch (our intranet) as well as posters located in or near the break room of each business location.

General profile image

Helping Those Who Suffered & Lost - 10 d ago

Apparently PetSmart doesn't value their associates or employees. If they did believe in the words themselves wrote, then why didn't they protect the employees from a known trouble making store manager? Either they lied and that they don't believe in the words they wrote or they support a former tyrant store manager that caused over a dozen and a half loyal, hard working employees to lose their jobs or forced out of it. Why do we have to keep going on about how terrible this situation is, when its a lot easier to praise PetSmart Corp. for doing the right thing and righting a wrong? The ball's in their court, we're awaiting on them to do the right thing by what they wrote themselves.

It's not a battle, it's not a war, it's only what's fair and what's right for those that were wrongfully fired, forced to quit and walk out due to a power hungry, I can do whatever i want, your word against mine higher power store manager that shouldn't of been in the first place.

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 7 h ago

For those of you that were wrongfully fired or forced out. Your jobs and careers are now available and they're trying to replace you. Department Manager PETSMART Moorestown, NJ via PetSmart Careers Over 1 month ago18 minFull-time Retail Sales Associate PetSmart Moorestown, NJ via Snagajob 3 days ago Early Morning Stocker PetSmart Moorestown, NJ via LinkedIn 2 days agoFull-time Pet Trainer PetSmart Moorestown, NJ via Snagajob 3 days ago Pet Groomer PetSmart Moorestown, NJ via Snagajob 3 days ago Retail Store Manager PetSmart Moorestown, NJ via Snagajob 3 days ago Pet Groomer Trainee PetSmart Moorestown, NJ via Snagajob 3 days ago Assistant Store Manager PetSmart Moorestown, NJ via Snagajob 3 days ago

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 6 h ago

9 Bad Manager Mistakes That Make Good People Quit If you want your best people to stay, you need to think carefully about how you treat them. Dr. Travis Bradberry , Contributor TalentSmart, President and 'Emotional Intelligence 2.0,' Coauthor 04/01/2017 02:27 PM ET | Updated Jun 06, 2017 Few things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door. Dr. Travis Bradberry shows you how to make it st Few things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door. Dr. Travis Bradberry shows you how to make it stop. (Getty) It's pretty incredible how often you hear managers complaining about their best employees leaving, and they really do have something to complain aboutfew things are as costly and disruptive as good people walking out the door. Managers tend to blame their turnover problems on everything under the sun, while ignoring the crux of the matter: people don't leave jobs; they leave managers. The sad thing is that this can easily be avoided. All that's required is a new perspective and some extra effort on the manager's part. Organizations know how important it is to have motivated, engaged employees, but most fail to hold managers accountable for making it happen. When they don't, the bottom line suffers. Research from the University of California found that motivated employees were 31% more productive, had 37% higher sales, and were three times more creative than demotivated employees. They were also 87% less likely to quit, according to a Corporate Leadership Council study on over 50,000 people. Gallup research shows that a mind-boggling 70% of an employee's motivation is influenced by his or her manager. So, let's take a look at some of the worst things that managers do that send good people packing. 1. They overwork people. Nothing burns good employees out quite like overworking them. It's so tempting to work your best people hard that managers frequently fall into this trap. Overworking good employees is perplexing; it makes them feel as if they're being punished for great performance. Overworking employees is also counterproductive. New research from Stanford shows that productivity per hour declines sharply when the workweek exceeds 50 hours, and productivity drops off so much after 55 hours that you don't get anything out of working more. If you must increase how much work your talented employees are doing, you'd better increase their status as well. Talented employees will take on a bigger workload, but they won't stay if their job suffocates them in the process. Raises, promotions, and title-changes are all acceptable ways to increase workload. If you simply increase workload because people are talented, without changing a thing, they will seek another job that gives them what they deserve. 2. They don't recognize contributions and reward good work. It's easy to underestimate the power of a pat on the back, especially with top performers who are intrinsically motivated. Everyone likes kudos, none more so than those who work hard and give their all. Managers need to communicate with their people to find out what makes them feel good (for some, it's a raise; for others, it's public recognition) and then to reward them for a job well done. With top performers, this will happen often if you're doing it right. 3. They fail to develop people's skills. When managers are asked about their inattention to employees, they try to excuse themselves, using words such as "trust," "autonomy," and "empowerment." This is complete nonsense. Good managers manage, no matter how talented the employee. They pay attention and are constantly listening and giving feedback. Management may have a beginning, but it certainly has no end. When you have a talented employee, it's up to you to keep finding areas in which they can improve to expand their skill set. The most talented employees want feedbackmore so than the less talented onesand it's your job to keep it coming. If you don't, your best people will grow bored and complacent. 4. They don't care about their employees. More than half of people who leave their jobs do so because of their relationship with their boss. Smart companies make certain their managers know how to balance being professional with being human. These are the bosses who celebrate an employee's success, empathize with those going through hard times, and challenge people, even when it hurts. Bosses who fail to really care will always have high turnover rates. It's impossible to work for someone eight-plus hours a day when they aren't personally involved and don't care about anything other than your production yield. 5. They don't honor their commitments. Making promises to people places you on the fine line that lies between making them very happy and watching them walk out the door. When you uphold a commitment, you grow in the eyes of your employees because you prove yourself to be trustworthy and honorable (two very important qualities in a boss). But when you disregard your commitment, you come across as slimy, uncaring, and disrespectful. After all, if the boss doesn't honor his or her commitments, why should everyone else? 6. They hire and promote the wrong people. Good, hard-working employees want to work with like-minded professionals. When managers don't do the hard work of hiring good people, it's a major demotivator for those stuck working alongside them. Promoting the wrong people is even worse. When you work your tail off only to get passed over for a promotion that's given to someone who glad-handed their way to the top, it's a massive insult. No wonder it makes good people leave. 7. They don't let people pursue their passions. Talented employees are passionate. Providing opportunities for them to pursue their passions improves their productivity and job satisfaction. But many managers want people to work within a little box. These managers fear that productivity will decline if they let people expand their focus and pursue their passions. This fear is unfounded. Studies show that people who are able to pursue their passions at work experience flow, a euphoric state of mind that is five times more productive than the norm. 8. They fail to engage creativity. The most talented employees seek to improve everything they touch. If you take away their ability to change and improve things because you're only comfortable with the status quo, this makes them hate their jobs. Caging up this innate desire to create not only limits them, it limits you. 9. They don't challenge people intellectually. Great bosses challenge their employees to accomplish things that seem inconceivable at first. Instead of setting mundane, incremental goals, they set lofty goals that push people out of their comfort zones. Then, good managers do everything in their power to help them succeed. When talented and intelligent people find themselves doing things that are too easy or boring, they seek other jobs that will challenge their intellects. Bringing It All Together If you want your best people to stay, you need to think carefully about how you treat them. While good employees are as tough as nails, their talent gives them an abundance of options. You need to make them want to work for you

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 7 h ago

If you quit your job because of intolerable work conditions or treatment, in certain circumstances, your resignation may be considered a termination. A resignation under these circumstances is called a "constructive discharge" or "constructive termination." If you were constructively discharged from your employment, the law will typically treat you as if you were fired. This means that you have certain rights that are typically not available to employees who quit their jobs, including the right to receive unemployment benefits and to file a wrongful termination lawsuit against your employer.

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 6 h ago

HUMAN RESOURCES CULTURE How to Professionally Deal With a Bad Boss Exhausted young man with laptop in office Share Flip Pin Share Email BY SUSAN M. HEATHFIELD Updated June 10, 2018 You're weary. You're frustrated. You're unhappy. You're demotivated. Your interaction with your boss leaves you cold. He's a bully, intrusive, controlling, picky or petty. He takes credit for your work, never provides positive feedback and misses each meeting he schedules with you. Or he caves immediately under pressure and fails to support you in accomplishing your job. He never recognizes your excellent performance or that of any other employee, so the office is joyless and unhappy. He's a bad boss, bad to the bone. Dealing with a less than effective manager, or just plain bad managers and bad bosses, is a challenge too many employees face. No matter the character of your bad boss, these ideas will help you deal with it. Your Bad Boss May Be Unaware He or She Is Bad Start your campaign by understanding that your boss may not know that he is a bad boss. Just as in situational leadership, the definition of bad depends on the employee's needs, the manager's skills and the circumstances. A hands-off manager may not realize that his failure to provide any direction or feedback makes him a bad boss. He may think he's empowering his staff. A manager who provides too much direction and micromanages may feel insecure and uncertain about his own job. He may not realize his direction is insulting to a competent, secure, self-directed staff member. Or, maybe the boss lacks training and is so overwhelmed with his job requirements that he can't provide support for you. Perhaps he has been promoted too quickly, or his reporting responsibilities have expanded beyond his reach. In these days of downsizing, responsibilities are often shared by fewer staff members than ever before which can affect their ability to do the job well. This bad boss may not share your values. The youngest generations of workers expect that they can use their vacation time and take action to make work-life balance a priority. A flexible work schedule may make the job their dream job. But, not all bosses share these views. Some, for example, think that remote workers harm the culture and interfere with developing a culture of teamwork. If your values are out of sync with those of your boss, and you don't think this imbalance will change, you do have a problem. Maybe it's time to change bosses. But, until then, these actions are recommended for you to preserve your relationship, such as it is. Recommended Approach to the Unwitting Bad Boss Talk to this boss. Tell him what you need from him in term of direction, feedback, and support. Be polite and focus on your needs. You need to tell the boss exactly what you need from him. Telling the boss that he's a bad boss is counterproductive and won't help you meet your goals. Ask the manager how you can help him reach his goals. Make sure you listen well and provide the needed assistance he requests. Seek a mentor from among other managers or more skilled peers, with the full knowledge and cooperation of your current manager, to enlarge your opportunity for experience. If you've taken these actions, and they haven't worked, go to your boss's manager and ask for assistance. Or, you can go to your Human Resources staff first, to rehearse and gain advice. Understand that your current boss may never forgive you, so ensure that you have done what you can do with him, before taking your issues up the line. You may never hear what the boss's boss or the HR staff did to help solve your bad manager's behavior. It's confidential. But, do allow some time to pass for the actions to have their desired impact. If nothing changes, despite your best efforts, and you think the problem is that they don't believe you, draw together coworkers who also experience the behavior. Visit the boss's manager to help him see the size and impact of the behavior. If you think the problem is that your boss can't or won'tchange, ask for a transfer to another department. This recommendation presumes you like your employer and your work, so you don't regard quitting or job searching as your best option. Free Guide: How to Nail Your Next Interview We'll email you tips to make a good impression and get the offer. ONE-TAP SUBSCRIBE If a transfer or promotion is unavailable, begin your search for a new job. Fleeing is always an option. You may want to conduct your job search secretly, but under the circumstances, it may be time for you to go. When the Bad Boss Knows A manager at a mid-sized manufacturing company wanted to improve his approach to working with his employees. He knew that he looked down his nose at them. He criticized and screamed at employees. He publicly humiliated any employee who made a mistake, as examples. One day he called to ask a question of his consultant. The question doomed her to disappointment when he said, "I know that you don't approve of me screaming at staff as a regular thing." Agreed, she said. "So, can you tell me, please, what are the circumstances under which it is okay for me to scream at them?" This manager thought his behavior was perfectly acceptable. (The end of the story? He never did change and was eventually removed as manager.) Most managers that bully, intimidate, cruelly criticize, name-call and treat you as if you are stupid likely know what they are doing. They may know they're bad and even revel in their badness. They may feel their behavior has been condonedand even encouragedwithin their organization. They may have learned the behaviors from their former supervisor who was viewed as successful. You don't have to put up with demeaning behavior. You deserve a good boss who helps your self-confidence and self-esteem grow. You deserve a good boss who helps you advance your career. You deserve civil, professional treatment at work. Recommended Approach to the Bad Boss Who Knows He's Bad Start by recognizing that you have the right to a professional environment in your workplace. You are not the problem. You have a bad boss. He is the problem. You need to deal with him. You can try talking with the bad boss to tell him the impact that his actions or words are having on you or your performance. In a rare blue moon, the bad boss might care enough to work to modify his behavior. If he does decide to work on his behavior, hold him to his commitments. If you allow him to yell at you, even just a little bit, you are training him that he can get away with his former behavior. Don't go to war publicly, but draw his behavior to his attention as soon as you have the opportunity, privately. If the behavior does not change, appeal to his supervisor and to Human Resources staff. Describe exactly what he does and the impact the behavior is having on you and your job performance. You may never hear what the boss's boss or the HR staff did to help solve your bad manager's behavior. It's confidential. But, do allow some time to pass for the actions they may have tried to have their desired impact. If nothing changes, despite your best efforts, and you think the problem is that they don't believe you, draw together coworkers who also experience the behavior. Visit the boss's manager to help him see the size and impact of the behavior. If you think the problem is that your boss can'tor won'tchange, ask for a transfer to another department. This recommendation presumes that you like your employer and your work. If not, job searching may be your next best option. If a transfer or promotion is unavailable, begin your search for a new job for sure. Fleeing is always an option if your bad boss won't change. You may want to conduct your job search secretly, but under the circumstances, it may be time for you to go.

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 7 h ago

You do have rights if you were forced to quit. In which this is the case in this situation.

1. At-Will Employment and its Limits

Employment is considered "at-will" under the laws of most states, which means your employer may fire you (and you may quit) for any reason or no reason at all. However, any termination (including "constructive dismissal," in which the employee is forced to quit) that violates anti-discrimination laws or contractual obligations, or which is done as retaliation, is illegal

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 6 h ago

https://amp.businessinsider.com/signs-of-a-bad-boss

General profile image

Legal Beagle - 9 d 6 h ago

LEAD 10 Worst Boss Traits (Ranked in Order of What Makes People Quit Most) Setting expectations is not as important as you think. Stealing the credit? That's a big mistake. By John BrandonContributing editor, Inc.com@jmbrandonbb In the 90s, when I worked as a corporate drone at a large consumer electronics retailer, I reported to a boss who didn't understand my skills or expertise. He would talk on and on about a large ERP install he was doing. I'd say "ER what?" and start talking about writing projects, a new usability and design lab we were building, and various employee conflicts. The underlying issue is that he didn't value my contribution or the contribution of my team. We were speaking different languages. Interestingly, he didn't exhibit the number one trait that makes people quit, which might explain why I stuck around a few more years after that. (In fact, we learned to get along eventually.) A new survey by a company called BambooHR polled 1,000 employees and ranked the top reasons they find another job. (They also found that 44% of those surveyed quit because of a bad boss.) Because these reasons for quitting are so common, I've added a few extra notes about why that bad boss attribute might be a problem--and how to overcome it. 1. Your boss takes credit for your work (63 percent) One of the big findings is that employees really hate it when the boss takes credit for their work. And, older employees (those over 45) get even more irritated. Why is it just a trigger? Employees want to be recognized, and then challenged to complete other lofty goals. When they realize they won't get any credit or someone will steal it, they lose all motivation. 2. Your boss doesn't appear to trust or empower you (62 percent) Trust and empowerment can change employee perceptions. When you show trust, you're essentially enabling the employee to succeed. Bad bosses don't understand that. They command and control, assuming an employee is going to fail or create conflict. To change, you have to demonstrate to an employee you are OK with small failures. 3. Your boss doesn't appear to care if you're overworked (58 percent) The boss is out playing golf or on vacation in Orlando. At work, the employees are stretched pretty thin. That's a problem because, from the perspective of the workers, there isn't an example of how to do the work, someone explaining how to finish tasks, or any time-table other than "get this done before the boss starts paying attention again." 4. Your boss doesn't appear to advocate for you when it comes to monetary compensation (wages/salary/bonuses) (57 percent) A curious one that ranks high on the list (above setting expectations or not getting a promotion), not advocating for an employee puts you in the doghouse. Why? Like the other high ranking reasons, the employee knows they won't get any credit (in this case, financially) for hard work. He or she will produce the work but won't ever get the recognition. 5. Your boss hires and/or promotes the wrong people (56 percent) Favoritism is another de-motivator. A bad boss picks the people he or she likes, regardless of skill level. It might be because that person also drives an Audi. Bad bosses don't fairly critique all employees and understand what it takes to do a specific job or role. 6. Your boss doesn't back you up when there's a dispute between you and one of your company's clients (55 percent) We all want advocates, a boss who will stand up for us. We also crave truth in the workplace, an understanding that it was your skill or your attitude that landed the big customer or pushed a project forward. Bad bosses are weak-willed individuals. They do the hard work of advocating because that involves conflict resolution, time and effort, and maybe even some emotion. 7. Your boss doesn't provide proper direction on assignments/roles (54 percent) When an employee doesn't know what to do it creates conflict because, really, that's why Susie is even on the accounting team. It's to use the skills and training she has to excel. We all want to be needed, to show we have amazing abilities. Good bosses know how to funnel all of that skill and creativity in the right direction; bad bosses zap it dead. 8. Your boss micromanages you and doesn't allow you the "freedom to work" (53 percent) Another big killer for motivation at work is when the boss nitpicks all day. It also reveals a lack of empathy, because the employee sees his or her work output as simply a blip on a screen, a code in a handbook. There's a person doing the work. An exceptional boss recognizes that every employee has individual needs and a desire to work creatively and with discretion. 9. Your boss focuses more on your weaknesses than your strengths (53 percent) A bad boss is a wrist slapper. He or she likes to point out anything that's wrong, mostly because the goal is for the boss to look good. When he or she constantly points out problems, it's because the boss wants to make sure the higher-ups don't see any flaws. Good bosses overlook minor issues and focus on the outcome. 10. Your boss doesn't set clear expectations (52 percent) Ranking much lower than expected (ahem), this bad boss trait is still one to avoid. It means the boss is not a good communicator, and the employee is a little lost in a maze. What is the role here? What is success? What are the steps to complete a task? When an employee doesn't know the outcome he or she will slip into a mode of low productivity and apathy.

Other Reviews & Comments

Frys Food Stores
Fran Scottsdale AZ: I go into my store where I always go, and I  ... 

Domino's Pizza, Inc.
Anonymous Received almost no training when i was hired was told to &q ... 

Papa Johns
Carl Hayes III Won't eat your pizza ever again for your mishandling of Mr  ... 

Lg Electronics USA
K. Smith I am utterly disgusted at the level of professionalism disp ... 

Rooms To Go
Kay Same thing is happening to me. I wish I had read these revi ... 

The Directv Group, Inc.
Anonymous Went to change the channel from some "war" movie  ... 

Arvest Bank-Bentonville
Amanda Bought a truck from a company harvest bought and every mont ... 

Mercedes-Benz USA, Inc.
Guy I drive a 2017 leased E300. What was MB thinking when it el ... 

Fox News Network, LLC
4 anonymous Are you always offensive or just when you are calling Fox v ... 

Sonic Corp.
Anonymous I like Sonic. Been going there for years in Yukon Ok . Burg ... 

Toys R Us
Greg garrett I was a worker for toys r us and I been waiting on my check ... 

Wells Fargo & Company
Prof. Sylvanna Fraga The customer service I received from the operator Tia, was  ... 

Ashley Furniture
derek boothe Mr. Wanek, I would agree with -John Staumont- and says that ... 

McDonald's Corporation
Betty Gudgeon Thanking you for sending me an arch card that works.

Nordstrom, Inc.
DissappointedJM 7/8/18 I walked into a Nordstrom store in the Clackamas Tow ... 

LA-Z-Boy
Houston The one star is for my shopping experience only! I purchase ... 

T-Mobile USA, Inc.
TRACY RISCILE i need the email and phone number too! (hidden)

Sprint Nextel Corporation
Sylvie I've been in a contract with sprint for 2 years now And I'v ... 

Bank of America Corporation
L I pulled my account with BoA years ago when they gave credi ... 

Denny's
Angela Your food is disgusting; customer service is pathetic; and  ... 

Nissan North America, Inc.
Brian It's a shame Nissan really isn't wanting to warranty things ... 

Delta Airlines
Ret.Army.Sgt. Nicky Colon My wife been flying with Delta Airlines for the past 11 yea ... 

United Healthcare Insurance Company
TC This company is ludicrous You are in every state so why do  ... 

Hyundai USA
Raj MY 5 yr warranty expires on JULY 29th 2018-

Amazon
Anonymous Put those numbers up. Either on my ff13 page Douglas Korkan ... 

Taco Bell Corp.
Lemoore, CA Dissatisfied Customer You would think that after receiving one star, receiving ho ... 

U-Haul Rental System
Nina There is no such business as "u-haul rental system&quo ... 

Sears Roebuck & Co
Mary Lipscomb I have a brand new microwave oven which is broken. I have b ... 

United Parcel Service, Inc.
Action als automtive antique So still no response n someone called n hung up without spe ... 

Discount Tire
Anonymous We dealt with Eduardo assistant store manager and Mike stor ... 

Walgreens
Debra Caille I would like to submit a complaint Walgreens located at 292 ... 

Dollar General
Anonymous I have supported and shopped at the south 51 dollar general ... 

Burger King Worldwide Inc
Suzie Hello, I just wanted to let you know about Burger King Stor ... 

The Wendy's Company
sunnie emerson I live in Sarasota, Fl and have been a customer most days o ... 

Chrysler Group LLC
marcobob naples dodge, naples fl. worst service department ever. I w ... 

Nike
Rainer Fruechtnicht I bought Nike Air Monarch shoes. After a very short period  ... 

Family Dollar Stores, Inc.
Mad momma Family dollar in kershaw south carolina has no employees th ... 

Enterprise Holdings, Inc.
BF I had a rental from Enterprise for about 3 days because I h ... 

American Express Company
Sue Have had an Amex credit card since June, 2018, received 1st ... 

Target
Walt R RIDICULOUS!!! I have called 3 times to find out why my orde ... 

Costco
Thoraia soliman THE LEGECEY OF THE GREAT CUSTOMER SERVICE IS GONE. After be ... 

Public Storage
Mimi Oh my I've been waiting for someone since 1130 on the offic ... 

Whole Foods Market, Inc.
jackie I can say that I truly appreciate Whole Foods at our local  ... 

Fandango Inc.
Jody The issue has NOT been resolved and I am a very unhappy cus ... 

Lowe's
Mary Nix Lowe's in Mustang, OK., is so very unprofessional and lacki ... 

AT&T
Lady T Oh! Check this out "We been with them 2 years, include ... 

Google Inc.
Anonymous These Google Liberal Pigs need to be sued for violating Fir ... 

J. C. Penney Corporation, Inc.
A concerned associate. I work at the Cheektowaga, NY store 2364 and I am very conc ... 

Ross Stores
Anonymous I work in tampa fl. On hillsborough ave. High volume store. ... 

Outback Steakhouse
Tweet I had THE most unpleasant experience today at outback South ...